WHISKY PRIESTS

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Interviews

Radio Heemskerk, 14th December 1997

 

The following interview conducted by Mark C. Deren (MCD), with occasional questions from Gerrit Vermey (GV), has been transcribed from a 90-minute recording made at Radio Heemskerk, the Netherlands on 14th December 1997. An edited audio version of the interview, together with all the songs from the accompanying live session, was first issued by Whippet Records as The Whisky Priests ‘Live on Radio Heemskerk’ (WPTCD16) as a limited edition CD (1000 copies), given away free at the band’s concert at the Markthalle, Hamburg on 10th October 1998 (this concert was itself recorded and released as the Video and CD ‘“Here Come the Ranting Lads” - Live!’).


We now present the interview reproduced in its entirety, for the first time since its original broadcast…



[The show opened with a full band performance of ‘Song for Ewan’, live in the studio, after which Gary alone took part in the first interview session of the show]

MCD:

Now, Glenn.


Gary:

Glenn’s in there! (Signals to adjoining recording booth).

I’m Gary!


GV:

That’s Gary!


Gary:

Oh dear, we’ve cocked up already!


MCD:

Well, You guys are identical quins!


Gary:

Quins, yeah quins! Identical quins!


MCD:

Yeah, it’s hard to tell you apart, really, definitely. We saw you last year in Alkmaar and you’re a fantastic band. And what I really love about your music is it’s very, very inspirational and very sincere. And when I saw you guys playing live it was just unbelievable how much energy you pack into your music.

Now, it seems that you’ve had a very busy schedule haven’t you, 600 concerts in the last five years.


Gary:

Something like that, yeah, it’s been very busy.


MCD:

Yeah. Can you describe what you’ve done since last Friday, for example?


Gary:

Since last Friday? Well, we actually travelled on Friday to Hamburg and played a show in Hamburg. Kind of a promotional show because we hadn’t played in Germany for over a year. And we finished that, we did that on Saturday, and we left in the morning on Sunday to come here, and straight after this we’re going home, so it’s quite a long weekend, but that’s quite typical for us, actually.


MCD:

Yeah, you’ve spent the whole day driving over here. That’s real nice.


Gary:

That’s right, yeah.


MCD:

And tonight your going to Calais in France and then you’re going to take the ferry back to England. Where do you come from in England?


Gary:

I actually live right up in the North East of England, so once we actually get into Dover, the ferry port in England, it’s going to be a good nine hours or so before I actually get home after that, so we’ve got quite a long way, yeah.


MCD:

Oh my gosh. So you’re used to going like 24-hours without sleep.


Gary:

Oh yeah, yeah. We’re used to going longer than that without sleep to be honest.


MCD:

Wow. What’s your driving inspiration? I mean, what drives you to work so hard? Just the love of the music, or…?


Gary:

I think it is just a pure determination and we really believe so much in what we do that it kind of overcomes all the difficulties. Obviously, if we didn’t believe so much in what we do, we would have given up long before now. So, the driving force is just our self-belief, really, as much as anything.


MCD:

Well that’s really great. Now what you’re playing tonight is really something special for the listeners of Radio Heemskerk. You’re premiering songs from you new CD for the first time on the air.


Gary:

That’s right. Tonight is going to be the first airing of a lot of the songs. We’re recording the new album in January. So, it’s kind of good for us, it’s a rehearsal for us, a dress rehearsal for when we’re actually in the studio. It’s the first time we’ve tried these songs out in this kind of situation, so it’s good to run through them. Yeah, I mean, we’re quite excited about doing the new album.


MCD:

Wow. We’re really, really pleased to have you here, it’s a real honour for us.


Gary:

Well, it’s nice for us to be here, to be honest. Thanks for having us.


MCD:

Great. So, what would you like to play next?


Gary:

We’ve just been discussing what we’re going to play. We hadn’t really planned it too much in advance. We’d just been talking about it before I came in here. I think the next one’s going to be a song called ‘Car Boot Sale’.


MCD:

‘Car Boot Sale’?


Gary:

Yeah. Back home in England, we have a kind of a new fashionable tradition now, which in the last few years has become a big trend. It’s the latest craze. One of the latest crazes is the car boot sale.


MCD:

Car and boat?


Gary:

Boot. My dialect, you can’t understand it. Car boot. Boot.


MCD:

Boot? Ah, yeah, trunk.


Gary:

Car trunk sale, I should say.


MCD:

Before you start, I wanted to ask you, like, how do you think of all these lyrics for your songs? They’re mostly inspirational songs aren’t they? Or story songs?


Gary:

Yeah, I suppose they are really. I think, because I write most of the songs, it’s probably just down to the fact that I’ve got, you know, quite a vivid imagination (Laughs). And I’m very much an observer of what goes on around me, what I see. It’s just basically a mixture of, you know, my experiences, coupled with, you know, other people’s experiences as well. It’s not that I write songs specifically about myself, I tend to just take in everything that’s going on around me. I’m very much in my own little kind of world, if you like, looking out at what’s going on around me. And, you know, when I get an opportunity, I just write things down.


MCD:

You’re the principle songwriter of the band.


Gary:

Yeah, that’s right.


MCD:

And you’re highly acclaimed too. You have appeared in lots of publications, especially around Europe. So that’s really great.


Gary:

Yeah, it’s nice to have a little bit of acknowledgement for something that I do actually work hard at and it isn’t an easy thing. It’s not something that comes easily; I do have to work quite hard at it. I don’t know, it’s not something you can really explain.


MCD:

Yeah, you have a gift.


Gary:

Yeah, perhaps, I wouldn’t know what to call it.


MCD:

So, what about the boot?


Gary:

Ah yes, the car boot sale, yeah.


MCD:

The sail? What do you mean by sail?


Gary:

Sale, sale, S.A.L.E., sale.


MCD:

Ah, yes.


Gary:

This is kind of our first attempt at a kind of light-hearted, comical song. A car boot sale’s something that happens quite a lot now in England, especially up in the North East where I live. What actually happens is people find a big field, like a racecourse or somewhere. Everybody in the area brings their cars full of all the junk from their houses that they don’t want anymore. Instead of throwing it away, they have this big idea to bring it to the car boot sale in the back of their cars. And they set up a stall and all these other people come along and they look at all this rubbish and they buy it. And then when they want to throw it away, they bring it again, and it’s just a continuing thing.


MCD:

Yeah, one man’s trash is another man’s treasure.


Gary:

Exactly. Good line.


MCD:

O.K. You guys ready to play?


Gary:
Yeah, we’re going to for it, the ‘Car Boot Sale’.


[The band performs a version of ‘Car Boot Sale’ live in the studio, after which all five band members; Gary Miller, Glenn Miller, Andrew Tong, Hugh Bradley and Cozy Dixon make their way to the interview room, so that the whole band can now participate in the interview.]


MCD:

Yeah. O.K. Whisky Priests live on Radio Heemskerk. Hey guys, come on back! Come on back. Are you the spokesman for the band Gary? Yeah, come on in guys.

Do you guys do only concerts or do you do other things? Do you do radio appearances and television appearances and stuff?


Glenn:

Mostly concerts but we do radio too, very, very occasional TV, not as much as we would like. (No?) But lots of radio shows, interviews, the occasional things like this, and we’ve also done appearances in music shops, but mostly it’s live concerts, that’s our most common medium.


MCD:

Ah, yeah. So you guys have travelled all around Europe. Do you have like a favourite country? Of course, you’re going to say Holland, right?


(Everybody laughs)


Andy:

Erm… yeah!


Glenn:
Yeah, it probably is actually, for one or two reasons (Laughs). Yeah, we like Holland, we like Austria, that’s a good place for us to go to…


MCD:

How is Holland different than like some of the other European countries? What do you think about it?


Gary:
It’s flat.


(Everybody laughs)


Hugh:
You get mayonnaise on the chips, very nice.


Gary:

The problem with Holland is I’m always getting a stiff neck looking up at everybody.


Andy:

Yeah, everyone’s too tall!


Gary:

I’m not used to being so short in comparison too everybody else. The Dutch people are very tall, and I’m very short, so it’s a little bit intimidating sometimes!


MCD:

Now you guys are like identical twins, huh? The only way I can tell you apart is from your hairdos, your hairstyles.


Glenn:

I’ve got a hair-undo and he’s got a hairdo.


(Everybody Laughs)


Glenn:

I’ve got a hair don’t.


(Everybody laughs)


Glenn:

Don’t do it, don’t do it. If you could see it you wouldn’t do it (Laughs).


Gary:

It’s very difficult to tell us apart on the radio.


MCD:

Yeah, so besides this concert tonight that you’re doing here, what is the high point of your career so far?

Glenn:

We haven’t had it yet.


MCD:

No?


Glenn:

We’re still looking forward to it. That’s what keeps us going. We’re always searching for the next high point.


MCD:

Yeah, your new CD’s called ‘Think Positive!’ That’s really nice, yeah. Something we should always do, particularly round these holidays?


Glenn:

That’s the plan. The Whisky Priests think positive 1998. That’s the plan. High points included.


MCD:

You played at Hilversum right? You played down there on national radio.


Glenn:

Yes, we did Hilversum and we did ‘Leidse Kade Live’. So, we did two shows on Dutch radio in front of live audiences, and that was good fun. It was just like doing a gig really but the problem was trying to get motivated in the middle of the afternoon, rather than on the evening, you know.


MCD:

Ah yes. So that was pre-recorded?


That was, yeah, I think we did it ’93, ’94, something like that. It was a few years ago. I think perhaps, if they’re listening, we’re due for a return. Please book us now; we’d love to come back.


MCD:

Yeah, definitely, that’s a good place to play in Holland, definitely, national exposure. So, I read through your information here and, yeah, you’ve had some difficulties along the way. Could you describe some of the problems that you’ve had in having your own record company and being on the road so much?


Glenn:

Well, I’ll try my best, but I think it’s only a two-hour show, isn’t it?


(Everybody laughs)


Glenn:

Which bits do we leave out; let me think.


MCD:

You have the blue-ues? (Laughs)


Gary:

You know, because we do everything ourselves, there’s a lot of stress involved in what we do, so you were asking earlier about the motivation, you know, maybe because we do everything ourselves it kind of helps motivate us because we’re so determined to try and get to the position where life is a bit easier for us. That’s kind of our main drive and ambition at the minute, to get to a position where some of the workload is taken from us.


Glenn:

But also to try and do everything on our own terms, you know, I mean, one of the major problems we had a number of years ago, we were naïve enough when we were very young, ten years ago, to sign a recording and publishing deal with a company in England, and it was a nightmare situation for us. We had a lot of problems in the early days of the band.


MCD:

A lot of legal battles and stuff?


Glenn:

Yeah, we ended up actually at the High Court in London, but eventually it was resolved amicably out-of-court. But it seriously disrupted our careers in England, and from being in a position where a lot of major companies, major management and people like that were interested in moving the band on, there was a lot of media attention, we were going to be the next big thing. Suddenly, for two or three years, we could do nothing in England because of the stranglehold of this legal battle that we were in, which eventually got resolved, you know, to an adequate solution, which meant we could continue our careers, in our own right. And ever since then, we’ve been determined to do it on our own terms, and not have anybody else taking control of our destinies, so to speak. And ever since then, it’s been a struggle to get there, and it’s just getting better all the time. We’re gradually taking the barriers down and scaling the walls of the music business; so to speak, in our own determined little way.


MCD:

Is your type of music the main sort of music what you find in Northern England, the real folky stuff or…?


Glenn:

Not really, I mean, if you were to go to the clubs in Northern England, I think you’d here a lot of Heavy Metal and R ‘N’ B music. That’s what most of the bands tend to play. There’s nothing else like us in the North East of England, really. It’s a very unique kind of thing that we’re doing.


MCD:

Yeah, definitely.


Gary:

Even if you go in the kind of Folk Clubs and pubs and everything, although there’s a great tradition of North East Folk Music in the area, there aren’t a lot of people actually playing it now.


Glenn:
Yeah, but the thing is, we used to be a North East of England band. That is how we began, but now we’re a totally English band in the broadest sense because we have a great new line-up of guys with us now, who are from all over England, bringing new influences into what we do, having a real impact on the music we’re playing and the arrangements we’re doing, bringing their own unique experiences and styles of playing, and it’s a kind of menagerie of sound now, which is much better. We’re a cross-section of England now, in the band, you know.


MCD:

Everyone’s really good musicians. How old were you guys when you started playing together for the first time?


Glenn:

Well this line-up’s only been together six weeks.


MCD:

No, but I mean did you guys play together as little kids, as little twins?


Glenn:
We used to fight a lot! I once drove him through a glass door on a bicycle and hospitalised him for about six weeks, but…


Gary:

And that was the start; that was the start!


(Everybody laughs)


Andy:

It’s been downhill all the way since!


Glenn:

But it was an accident, you know, I didn’t realise the door was closed at the time!


MCD:

Maybe you’ll give him a clap on the way home tonight!


Glenn:

Gary and me didn’t actually start playing any real serious music until we were about seventeen, eighteen years old.


MCD:

Wow.


Glenn:

And that was when we really started to want to be in a band and began The Whisky Priests. It was the first band we really had.


MCD:

But how did you get that name, ‘Whisky Priests’?


We began the band in 1985, and at the time, we thought of about 100 names and they were all really bad. I can’t even remember any of them. We were thinking, “We need a good name, we need a good name”, and one of the people in the band was reading a book at the time called ‘The Power And...


MCD:

A boo-ook?


Glenn:

A book, a book.


MCD:

A boo-ook?


Glenn:

A beuk. A buck, dear boy. Somebody was reading a buck.


(Everybody laughs)


Glenn:

He was coming along to a rehearsal, and he said, “Hey guys, I’ve got a great name for the band, how about The Whisky Priests?” And the Whisky Priest was a character and he was in a book by a British novelist called Graham Greene. He was a famous writer, he wrote ‘Brighton Rock’ and many other famous books, and he wrote…


MCD:

But you guys don’t drink too much anymore do you?


Glenn:

Not anymore, no, no. We got it out of our system. This guy here, Mr. Hugh Bradley, is the band’s whisky drinker these days, ably supported by Mr. Andy Tong.


MCD:

The original whisky man (Laughs).


Glenn:

We drank a lifetime’s supply in the early days of the band.


Gary:

The baton has been passed.


(Everybody laughs)


Glenn:

We have new whisky standard bearers in the band.


MCD:

Yeah, I got it out of my system too, last week. (Laughs)

Can we talk to your drummer? We’re going to talk to Cozy for a second and introduce the next number. We’re going to play a few different numbers here, while the guys get set up to play another song. And Cozy…


Cozy:

First of all, you want to know how I got that name?


MCD:

Yeah.


(Everybody laughs)


Cozy:

I knew that was the question, because it always is. (Laughs)


MCD:

Your man Cozy, yeah.


Hugh:

He’s a very warm person.


MCD:

We’re going to play some different songs.


[In between a selection of unrelated material, Gary, Andy & Hugh perform a spontaneous live version of the accapella ‘Blackleg Mining Man’]


MCD:

You guys have been everywhere in Europe, including Eastern Europe.


Gary:
Yeah, we’ve been to quite a few places.


Glenn:

We haven’t been to Scandinavia; we’d like to get to Scandinavia, that would be good, but most of the rest of Europe we’ve done.


Gary:
We’ve done Denmark once.


MCD:

What other places would you like to travel to?


Glenn:

Well, it’s funny you should say that. There’s a possibility that the new album will be released in Japan. And if it goes out there and it’s successful, we could be looking at perhaps touring there within the next year. That is, only at this stage something that’s a possibility but it would be something that we would be keen to do. And we’re also very keen to get to the States. That would be great, the States, Canada and Australia, really, I think…


MCD:

The United States?


Glenn:

Yeah, well I mean, lots of people, like yourself are saying, “Well, that would be a good place for The Whisky Priests music”, so…


MCD:

Yeah, I took your CD home with me on my last trip to the United States and I let a few people listen to it, and they were really intrigued. Because the words are so motivational and every song you guys sing has a story. How do you remember all the words to all those songs?


Andy:
Luck.


Gary:
Well I forgot the words to the last one. I think it’s just a question of the more you play the songs, the more they stick in your mind, really.


MCD:

Do you, like, sit down and study the lyrics and, like, memorise them over, and over, and over again in your head?


Gary:
Well, when we have a new song, I try to just memorise it as we’re rehearsing it as a band and after a while it just sticks, basically.


Andy:
When we were in Salzburg a few weeks ago, we were rehearsing a new song, and Gary took the lyrics to bed with him that night and got up the next morning and said “I can remember them now”.


(Everybody laughs)


Gary:

That’s right, I take them to bed with me; the secret is out!


MCD:

Oh, Jeez. It’s not good for your sex life.


Andy:

It depends what you do with it.


MCD:

Taking your lyrics to bed with you. Yeah, that was Andy Tong on bass.


Glenn:
Talking of sex life!


MCD:

Andy, you’re new in the band, aren’t you?


Andy:

Yeah.


MCD:

You’re very talkative, aren’t you?


Andy:

Oh very, yeah.


Hugh:

Don’t start him!


MCD:

Where do you come from?

Andy:
Margate, in Kent, sort of near Dover.


MCD:

Ah, super. And how far is that from where the original Whisky Priests come from?


Andy:
A long way. Yeah, I don’t know how many miles…it’s about 250-300 miles.


Glenn:
I think his home is nearer to Heemskerk than it is to our homes.


Andy:
Yeah, quite possibly.


MCD:

And you guys are driving all the way back there tomorrow. You’re going to be driving through the night tonight, back to Calais; then you’re taking the ferry across and driving home. You come out York actually, right?


Glenn:

Well, that will be the last stop, and then Gary will stay at my home in York, and then he has another two hours to drive further north, towards Scotland almost.


MCD:

You guys will be really tired tomorrow, definitely. What are some of your favourite countries, I mean what were some of your favourite experiences travelling around Europe? Has your equipment ever been stolen, or anything?


Glenn:

Oh, yes, in York!


(Everybody laughs)


Glenn:

True, in York.


MCD:

It might be getting stolen right now!


Andy:

I just saw someone walking out with a couple of guitars!


Gary:

We once got our van broken into in Holland as well, in Rotterdam.


MCD:

Yeah?


Gary:

As you said yourself, as you know, we’ve played in lots of countries and we’ve played lots of concerts, so we’ve got lots and lots of experiences, you know.


MCD:

Yeah.


[The band next performed live versions of ‘Brothers in Arms Again’ and a special version of ‘This Village’, with slightly altered lyrics and dedicated to Radio Heemskerk.]


MCD:

Wow. Was that as good for you as it was for me? Thank you men, that was beautiful, yeah. Come back you guys.


GV:

That was a song from your latest album, I believe?


Glenn:

The previous one, yeah.


Gary:

Life’s Tapestry.


GV:

Who of you is writing the songs? Do you do it together?

Gary:
I write them.


GV:

You write the songs?


MCD:

But he memorises them also. That was beautiful.


Gary:

Yeah, I forgot that one; I had to make up some words, because I couldn’t remember it!


MCD:

That was the Heemskerk version.


Gary:

Yeah, I had to mumble “Heemskerk” a few times to help me through it.


(Everybody laughs)


GV:

You’re playing for twelve years together now, is that right?


Glenn:

Us two, yeah.


GV:

You together, and different members?


Glenn:

Yes.


GV:

That’s a very long time, twelve years.


Gary:

Yes, it’s been a big part of our lives.


Glenn:
All of our adult lives, really.


MCD:

Are your parents and the other members of your family also musicians?


Glenn:

No.


MCD:

Are you the only two kids in your family?


Glenn:

Yes.


Gary:

Yeah, that was enough!


(Everybody laughs)


Glenn:

My parents said, “That’s enough, no more, never again.”


MCD:

I can imagine you guys, how energetic you always were, because when I saw you live in Alkmaar last year, it’s amazing, yeah, like you said, you’re not the biggest guys in the world but you sure can run around with that, I mean, you were jumping like four feet in the air, a metre in the air, with an accordion when I saw you playing.


Gary:
It was hollow!

Glenn:

The accordion is full of helium!


(Everybody laughs)


Gary:

Can I just interject here to say it’s really good of you, because my favourite TV programme is Doctor Who, and I’d just like to say thanks for bringing the Tardis console here.


(Everybody laughs)


Cozy:
Yeah, it is, isn’t it.


MCD:

This looks like the spaceship Enterprise here at Radio Heemskerk. We have a nice panel. Did you guys know that we were the best local radio station in the Netherlands last year?


Glenn:

Congratulations! I can well believe it. Let’s hear it for Radio Heemskerk! Hip-hip (Hooray!). Hip-hip (Hooray!). Hip-hip (Hooray!) Well done, I can understand, that’s great.


GV:

The album ‘Blood Live Well!’ (sic) was recorded live on New Years Eve, in 1993 I believe it was. Why New Years Eve. Is there a reason for it?


Glenn:

Well, we were in the stages of deciding to do a live album and…


Gary:

After the previous album, it seemed the next album should be a live one; it seemed the right time in our career to make a live album.


Glenn:

And we were looking for a gig to choose to record and we had a really big tour through October, November and December all over Europe at the end of 1992, and suddenly this concert came in where we were booked to play New Years Eve in Hamburg, and we thought, “Hey this has to be the gig to record live, it’s a very special occasion”. And we knew we would get a good crowd, we always do well in Hamburg, and it was New Year, big party night. It just seemed the obvious choice. We were thinking of a live album at the time, the gig was there, it had to be done.


GV:

Do you have an explanation why you are so popular in Germany? Is there a reason for it?


Glenn:

Not really. I think if you look back over our career, I think a lot of it is more to do with the fact that round about ’92, ’93, ’94, we did a lot of concerts in Germany. As I told you earlier, we had a lot of problems at the beginning of the ’90’s in England with our record company, meaning we couldn’t put out new material and do many concerts in England and we started coming to Europe, and the first country we visited in Europe, in 1989, was Germany. And it was just the first place we played outside of England, and suddenly, before we knew what was happening, we were doing a lot of concerts there. And it kind of just grew from that, you know, I think over our career we’ve done more concerts in Germany than any other country except for England. So I think it’s more to do with that. You see, we’re such a live band, if people see us perform live, they’re hooked, and we did a lot of concerts and it just grew from there.


Gary:
We’ve played over 200 concerts now in Germany and our early concerts in Germany were very energetic, very crazy. There were some very memorable concerts, and I think a lot of it grew first of all from word of mouth, from people who saw our first concerts in Germany. We made a very big impression with our first two or three tours, and it just grew from there. A lot of it was word of mouth. We got a little bit of press, not a huge amount, but some.


MCD:
Your music really excites people, definitely.


Glenn:

I think if we had played as many concerts, for example, in Holland as we have done in Germany, we would be really huge here now, I think. But we have done quite a lot of concerts in Holland now, and they’ve always been very good. We did a sell-out show in Holland last month, it was the only concert here on the tour and it was sold out two weeks before the gig. People were travelling from all over Holland, they were getting ‘phone calls all week, so I think it’s really starting to get interesting now.


Gary:

The people at the venue said they could have sold it out three times.


Glenn:
So I think that’s a good sign that things are happening here now. It’s been a lot of hard work, a lot of concerts in Holland over the last five years, but we’re getting a really good following here. And we’re excited about coming back; I think the first week in June, we will return for five or six shows to promote the new album.


MCD:

Oh great!


Glenn:

We’re really looking forward to that, I think we will have some great evenings and some great fun.


MCD:

Do you think you’ll be playing in Alkmaar or around here? Are you open to playing anywhere?


Glenn:

Yeah, I mean, at the moment the dates have just really gone in to the hands of the agency here in Holland. Last week, we sat down and said, “These are the dates we want to come back”.


MCD:

So you have a lot of people working for you too, to plan all your tours?


Glenn:
We have a few agents and distributors.


MCD:
Yeah, I noticed in your information.


Glenn:
We can’t do everything, so we have to have other people doing certain things in each country.


MCD:

You have distributors in about ten different countries?


Glenn:
That’s correct, yeah.


MCD:

Well, I was wondering, your music could be, like, bar music. Do you ever have, like, really rowdy crowds watching your music? Where would you say your fans are the rowdiest, where everybody’s drinking and throwing bottles and stuff?


(Everybody laughs)


Gary:
If they throw bottles, they get them thrown back!


MCD:

Do you ever have to play like in a cage or anything?


(Everybody laughs)


Glenn:

No, not really.


Gary:
We do have some crazy, enthusiastic fans, but our audience, I think, is very mixed, you know, we don’t have a certain type of person who comes to see The Whisky Priests, it’s all different types of people.


Glenn:

Our music has a universal broad appeal, so we get old people, young people, different kinds of people. You always get a lot of people dancing and going crazy, but there are also a lot of people who just watch and listen to the words.


MCD:

Yeah, I remember from your concert last year, mostly in the crowd there were all beautiful women.


Gary:

Maybe I had my eyes shut because I didn’t see them!


Glenn:

No, we do, we get all kinds of people. We get beautiful women, we get ugly men, we get, you know, everything…


Gary:
…ugly women and beautiful men.


Glenn:
Yeah, we don’t mind.


MCD:
I want to ask Hugh a question. You’re the mandolin player, yeah, and in this programme, progressive rock programme, I like really to play music from multi-instrumentalists. You tell us what instruments you play. I know it’s a lot of them, a lot of different ones.


Hugh:
All together I play mandolin, bouzouki, guitar, bass guitar, penny whistle and flute.


MCD:
Wow, penny whistle.


Glenn:
And he sings very well. He’s a very good singer.


MCD:
And where do you come from, Hugh?


Hugh:

I come from the North of England, also.


MCD:

Oh really, around the same…?


Hugh:
Near York, maybe fifty kilometres from York.


MCD:

Ah, yeah, that’s great.


[The band plays ‘Going to the Mine’ and 'Leave Her Johnny Leave Her’ live in the studio]


GV:
I want to thank you gentlemen here that you were here tonight; it was lovely. I hope you come back some time later, in June I believe.


All:

Thank you very much. Merry Christmas. Good-bye from The Whisky Priests.

 

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